Quote
"Julia Stanley and Susan Robbins have written of the peculiar history of the pronoun “She”, which was introduced into Middle English as a late development. During the Middle Ages, “he” had come to be both the female and the male pronoun. After “she” was introduced, it referred only to females, while “he” became “generic,” allegedly including women. This transition in the history of the pronoun “he” was hardly significant: “Since the female pronoun always designates females–while the male designates all humans as well as all males, patriarchal language, as manifested in the pronominal system of English, extended the scope of maleness to include humanity, while restricting femaleness to “the Other,” who is by implication nonhuman. Any speaker internalizing such a language unconsciously internalizes the value underlying such a system, thus perpetuating the cultural and social assumptions necessary to maintain the patriarchal power structure."

— Mary Daly (via yoursocialconstructsareshowing)

(via marjchaos)

Quote
"The attack on vegetarians for being emotional demonstrates how the dominant culture attempts to deflect critical discourse. As Bridget Brophy comments, “To assert that someone other than oneself has rights is not sentimental. Not that it would be the gravest of sins if it were. ‘Sentimentalist’ is the abuse with which people counter the accusation that they are cruel.” The characterization of the objection to animals killed for food as feminine or ‘womanish’ because of its perceived ‘emotional’ tone contributes to its muting through its association with women, who are also muted in a patriarchal culture."

Carol J. Adams, The Sexual Politics of Meat (1990)

(Source: irritable-belle-syndrome, via ibt-w)

Quote
"Audre Lorde argues throughout her work that we should not be protected from what hurts. We have to work and struggle not so much to feel hurt but to notice what causes hurt, which means unlearning what we have learned not to notice. We have to do this work if we are to produce critical understandings of how violence, as a relation of force and harm, is directed toward some bodies and not others."

— Sara Ahmed ‘The Promise of Happiness’ (via postcolonialfeminist)

@

Video

Phyllis Chesler “The New Anti-Semitism: Reflections After A Decade on the Front Lines”

Quote
"

My pacifism was first challenged when, working on my book on pornography in the late 1970s, Pornography: Men Possessing Women, I read a half dozen biographies of the Marquis de Sade. A life of rape and sexual violence, including kidnapping and possibly murder, would have been stopped short if his first (known) victim, Jeanne Testard, had killed him.

I will say here what I have never said before: my pacifism was not challenged by the beating and torture I experienced in marriage some thirty years ago; I finally got away not because I knew that he would kill me but because I thought I would kill him. Understand: this is true generally of women—his life meant more to me than my own; but also I was not willing to kill, even to escape beating and his own promise, which I believed, that he would kill me.

Once having had the serious and true thought that one of his victims should have offed the good Marquis, it was impossible not to apply that insight to the widespread, contemporary beatings and rapes that women sustain. Especially, I have seen a legal system designed to protect male privilege work to do just that. I have seen a generation of anti-rape activists and anti-battery activists sit through trials of guilty men who almost always walk. Like those advocates, I have seen rapists acquitted, batterers put back in the home, child-rapers given custody of the incested child. The legal system is so genuinely perverse that women rarely report crimes involving either rape or battery.

I am, as a result, a lapsed pacifist. I truly abhor violence and I believe that both nationalism and male dominance are systems that promote and produce violence. With extreme difficulty and reluctance I have come to believe that women have to be literate in both strategic violence and the violence of self-defense. It is one thing to choose not to kill; it is quite another to be defenseless by virtue of ignorance and socialization.

"

Scapegoat, by Andrea Dworkin

(via exgynocraticgrrl)

(via yoursocialconstructsareshowing)

Quote
"Thanks to physicians who wanted to be able to engage in this branch
of medical business without running afoul of the law, and thanks to
population planners who saw a need for limiting reproduction of some populations, and thanks to liberal men who put a higher priority on sexual access to women in general as a method of control and subordination than on patriarchal control of specific women, and thanks hardly at all to the considerable efforts of women, a way was found in Roe v. Wade to legalize abortion without acknowledging women’s right to autonomy in reproductive decision making."

— Twiss Butler, Abortion and Pornography: The Sexual Liberals’ “Gotcha” Against Women’s Equality

Quote
"Rapes by acquaintances, compared with strangers, were more likely to involve a single offender and multiple episodes, were less likely to be seen as rape or to be revealed to anyone, and were similar in terms of the victim’s resistance. In general, acquaintance rapes were rated as less violent than stranger rapes. The exception was rapes by husbands or other family members which were rated equally violent to stranger rapes but were much less likely to occur in a context of drinking or other drug use. In spite of these different crime characteristics, virtually no differences were found among any of the groups in their levels of psychological symptoms."

Stranger and Acquaintance Rape: Are There Differences In the Victim’s Experience?

"VIRTUALLY NO DIFFERENCES WERE FOUND AMONG ANY OF THE GROUPS IN THEIR LEVELS OF PSYCHOLOGICAL SYMPTOMS"

"VIRTUALLY NO DIFFERENCES WERE FOUND AMONG ANY OF THE GROUPS IN THEIR LEVELS OF PSYCHOLOGICAL SYMPTOMS"

"VIRTUALLY NO DIFFERENCES WERE FOUND AMONG ANY OF THE GROUPS IN THEIR LEVELS OF PSYCHOLOGICAL SYMPTOMS"

Read it, remember it, and STOP repeating bullshit.

cc: Richard Dawkins

(via brutereason)

(via brutereason)

Quote
"The sense of isolation that depression produces is so familiar. It doesn’t matter how much time I spend with people or talk to them. I feel like I’m barricaded from everyone with a wall of frosted glass, and I can’t see or hear them clearly. (Obviously, they can’t see or hear me clearly, either.) After a while, you forget the glass is there, because you’ve gotten so used to the way the world and the people in it look from behind the wall.
Empathy becomes very difficult, not like it is for me on better days. Not because I don’t care, but because I just can’t understand. Why doesn’t everyone else want to lie in bed all day? Isn’t anyone else just too tired for all this shit? Why do things? Why have relationships, why invest in anything?
From behind the glass wall, other people and the things they do make no sense at all. I’m sure I don’t make any sense to them, either.
But at least I’m not sad or anxious most of the time (though when it hits, it really hits). I’m actually strangely calm. Things happen to me and I sort of absorb them, because I don’t feel like I have much if any control over them.
It’s been two weeks, which is the minimum for a depression diagnosis. Of course, I’m never entirely symptom-free anyway, but it’s still very obvious when the symptoms increase to a level of clinical significance. So I have it, again. I’m almost resigned to it. It was always going to come back; it was only a matter of time."

Brute Reason:  

Quote
"Pornography is subordination seen as an invasion of privacy. It relies
on the existence of an idea of privacy in order to demonstrate power and dominance by violating it. There must be limits so that limits can be overrun. Physically, it uses the most elemental imagery of human vulnerability—the naked body and particularly the naked woman among clothed men. Dominance and the threat of violence are thus made flesh."

— Twiss Butler, Abortion and Pornography: The Sexual Liberals’ “Gotcha” Against Women’s Equality

Quote
"In an unfree society, most of the activities called consensual represent the capitulation of the powerless to the demands of the powerful. Power comes in various guises, as money, status, patriarchy, and as emotional invulnerability."

— Germaine Greer, Gluttons for porn

(Source: radical-bias, via yoursocialconstructsareshowing)